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Defective Brake Pressure Valve Causes GM Recall

In September 2021, a fire technical expert noticed an issue that caused an underhood fire on a 2021 GMC Sierra 2500. The expert notified the Speak Up For Safety Program about the problem. Not long after, a second underhood fire occurred involving a Sierra 2500. GMC became aware of the problem and a recall was issued. 

The frightening fire problem stems from a gap between the brake pressure modulator valve (BPMV) and the bolt head. 

In both cases, the trucks were parked outside in heavy rainfall. Because of the aforementioned gap, water became trapped in the BPMV and shorted a circuit, leading to the underhood fires. 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, it appears as though the bolts attached to the BPMV were not properly tightened. As a result, the two pieces did not form a proper seal and water intrusion occurred. 

This could be the result of a temporary production process change. Because of this temporary change, there were offline replacements made regarding the electronic brake control module. 

Who is affected by this recall?

At the time of the recall, more than 450 vehicles were held at the factory. Additionally, more than 4,000 vehicles already in distribution have been recalled. You may have been affected by this recall if you own a 2020-2021 model GMC Sierra or Chevrolet Silverado heavy-duty pickup.

Notification of this recall should have begun in November 2021. If you believe your vehicle may be affected and you have yet to receive a notice, it could be time to contact a lawyer. The manufacturer has a legal obligation to replace or repair the defective part for you. 

What are the dangers of a defective brake pressure valve?

As with this particular recall, the defective brake pressure valve can be quite dangerous as it is known to cause underhood fires in certain conditions. But generally speaking, there are other dangers of defective brake pressure valves that you should be aware of.

As a piece of your vehicle’s interlocking brake system, the BPMV regulates the pressure applied to each brake.  Ideally, equal pressure will be placed onto each of the four brakes when your foot compresses the pedal. But if your system senses that a tire is about to lock up, it will readjust the pressure to prevent the affected wheel from faltering. 

If this system is defective, it can lead to corrosion or brake fluid contamination. It can also cause dangerous braking behavior that may lead to an accident. 

What should you do if your vehicle is recalled?

If you receive formal notice of a recall, you should follow the instructions provided to you. Pay special attention to any deadlines to make sure you receive the appropriate repairs or replacements. 

If you do not receive a formal notice but believe your vehicle has been recalled, contact a dealership or the manufacturer of the vehicle. And if necessary, consider calling your lawyer as well. In California, the Lemon Law ensures that all consumers are protected from defective products. 

A defect covered by the warranty should be repaired at no cost to you. So if the dealership or manufacturer is unresponsive or difficult, an attorney from Wirtz Law APC can help you with your lemon law rights. 

For more information call the experienced trial attorneys at (833) 4MY-LEMON for a free case evaluation.

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