CA Supreme Court Holds Employers Are Not Required to Police Meal Breaks

Today, the California Supreme Court issued its long awaited decision in Brinker Restaurant Corp. v. Super. Ct. (SC S166350) holding that the nature of an employer’s duty to provide meal periods is an obligation to relieve an employee of all of his or her duties, with the employee thereafter at liberty to use the meal period for whatever purpose he or she desires.  Importantly, the Supreme Court made it clear that the employer is not required to ensure that no work is done.  In simple terms, an employer must provide a meal break which permits the employee complete freedom from job duties, but the employer is not required to police xanax each employee to make certain the meal break is being taken without performing any work for the employer.  Click here for a full copy of the published decision.

Thank you for your interest in this article.  You should not rely upon it as legal advice. The information contained herein does not create an attorney-client relationship. This article is intended for entertainment and general information purposes only. Laws vary state. Anyone seeking legal advice for a specific situation should consult a qualified lawyer or similar qualified professional in the appropriate state.  

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